Book Update: macOS Installation v4

The third update to my book “macOS Installation for Apple Administrators” is available.

If you have already purchased the book, you can get the update in the Apple Books application on your iOS device or Mac.

While I was putting this book together, macOS High Sierra was very much a moving target and I had to update and change sections frequently, sometimes while they were being written. Thankfully, the changes to macOS deployment and installation have calmed down somewhat since then. While Mojave and the new Mac hardware have brought some changes, they are not as disruptive as High Sierra, UAMDM and the iMac Pro were.

Originally, I made a commitment to update the book up to the macOS Mojave release. This is the book’s first post-Mojave update. I am planning at least one more update to cover any changes the Mojave “Spring Update” might bring.

Once we know more about macOS 10.15 after WWDC, I will decide on the book’s further future. As I have outlined in my 2018 review/2019 outlook post, I don’t expect dramatic changes this year, so it will probably make sense to keep the book going for the lifetime of 10.15.

It is quite likely that the deployment workflows outlined in “macOS Installation” will serve MacAdmins well for the foreseeable future.

This update received quite a bit of new content. I have rewritten and expanded many sections. The book is now eleven pages longer than the third version and sixteen pages longer than the first release. I have added many more links to external pages, tools, posts and support articles where they are available.

The update is free when you have already purchased the book. Unfortunately, the “updates” area seems to have gotten lost in the Apple Books app re-deisgn. You can just follow the link to the Apple Book store and the app should tell you that an update is available.

If you don’t have it yet, buy it now and get all future updates for free!

Here is a detailed list of most of the changes, which you can also find in the ‘Version History’ section of the book itself. (The version history in the book is linked to the actual changed section for easier reference.)

  • added description of the new –downloadassets option when creating external installer drives
  • updated description the –preservecontainer option in Erase Installation
  • updated descriptions of Secure Boot in various locations to reflect the Mac models introduced in October 2018
  • added an overview table for which current Mac models have Secure Boot and their minimum OS Versions
  • added links to the support pages for more versions of macOS in Older macOS Versions
  • moved and extended the section on Hardware Specific Systems and Installers
  • added downgrading limitation to Erase Installation
  • added description of fdesetup list to the FileVault section
  • added description of Twocanoe’s MacDeployStick to Sideloading Packages
  • added Manual Enrollment by IT to Manual Enrollment
  • added EraseInstall application to Restoring macOS
  • added link to support article with supporting servers to Device Enrollment Program
  • several typos, changes and clarifications

Scripting OS X

gamingdirectional: Moving the player object in Pygame

In the last chapter we have created the animation effect for the player object and in this chapter, we will move the player object in the x-axis. We will leave the wall and boundary collision detection mechanism to the next chapter. In the last chapter we have already linked up the keyboard events with the game manager class and in this chapter, we only need a slight modification to move the…

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codingdirectional: Return the list of the number and its power with python

Before we start our new python project here is another solution for one of the python’s question on codewars. In this example, we need to create a method which will accept a number and returns a list consists of a pair of a number and power that are equal to that input number. For example, the input number is 9, then the number and it’s power which is equals to that input number is [3, 2] because 3 * 3 = 9. If there is no number and power that match the input value then None will be returned. Here is the solution to the above mentioned question.

 def isPP(power):          for num in range(1, power):         for po in range(2, power):             if(num ** po == power):                 return [num, po]            return None 

The above method is only suitable to solve a number input which is below 1800, the program will become freeze if the number goes beyond that value (depends on the processing power of your own computer). Well, hope you like this quick solution, in the next chapter we will begin our project.

Planet Python

Podcast.__init__: Computational Musicology For Python Programmers

Music is a part of every culture around the world and throughout history. Musicology is the study of that music from a structural and sociological perspective. Traditionally this research has been done in a manual and painstaking manner, but the advent of the computer age has enabled an increase of many orders of magnitude in the scope and scale of analysis that we can perform. The music21 project is a Python library for computer aided musicology that is written and used by MIT professor Michael Scott Cuthbert. In this episode he explains how the project was started, how he is using it personally, professionally, and in his lectures, as well as how you can use it for your own exploration of musical analysis.

Summary

Music is a part of every culture around the world and throughout history. Musicology is the study of that music from a structural and sociological perspective. Traditionally this research has been done in a manual and painstaking manner, but the advent of the computer age has enabled an increase of many orders of magnitude in the scope and scale of analysis that we can perform. The music21 project is a Python library for computer aided musicology that is written and used by MIT professor Michael Scott Cuthbert. In this episode he explains how the project was started, how he is using it personally, professionally, and in his lectures, as well as how you can use it for your own exploration of musical analysis.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $ 20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • And to keep track of how your team is progressing on building new features and squashing bugs, you need a project management system designed by software engineers, for software engineers. Clubhouse lets you craft a workflow that fits your style, including per-team tasks, cross-project epics, a large suite of pre-built integrations, and a simple API for crafting your own. Podcast.__init__ listeners get 2 months free on any plan by going to pythonpodcast.com/clubhouse today and signing up for a trial.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Michael Cuthbert about music21, a toolkit for computer aided musicology

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what computational musicology is?
  • What is music21 and what motivated you to create it?
    • What are some of the use cases that music21 supports, and what are some common requests that you purposefully don’t support?
  • How much knowledge of musical notation, structure, and theory is necessary to be able to work with music21?
  • Can you talk through a typical workflow for doing analysis of one or more pieces of existing music?
    • What are some of the common challenges that users encounter when working with it (either on the side of Python or musicology/musical theory)?
    • What about for doing exploration of new musical works?
  • As a professor at MIT, what are some of the ways that music21 has been incorporated into your classroom?
    • What have they enjoyed most about it?
  • How is music21 implemented, and how has its structure evolved since you first started it?
    • What have been the most challenging aspects of building and maintaining the music21 project and community?
  • What are some of the most interesting, unusual, or unexpected ways that you have seen music21 used?
    • What are some analyses that you have performed which yielded unexpected results?
  • What do you have planned for the future of music21?
  • Beyond computational analysis of musical theory, what are some of the other ways that you are using Python in your academic and professional pursuits?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA


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